More Epic Gear

About 2 days ago, I went with a couple of friends to find a wok for one of them.  Along the way, we walked into a store that, although it didn’t have a wok, it did have something else.

Swords.  The place sold swords.  At half price.

When I was a kid, I always wished I could just walk into a place and buy a sword.  Then I could become a knight and defeat monsters, but the sword bit kept interfering; how on earth am I supposed to become a knight without a sword?

Finding these swords was a dream come true for me.  Finding them at half price… was too good to pass up.

Way I figure it, I could have bought one of these when I was 18.  I’m a couple of years late.

I want one THIS big!

I want one THIS big!

Half sheathed.

Half sheathed.

Fully Sheathed.

Fully Sheathed.

Unsheathed...

Unsheathed...

... and unleashed!

... and unleashed!

All in all, this gives me a single reaction.

GLEE.

GLEE.

Lizard says hi.

EDIT: I forgot to post a picture of the symbols! Here it is:

If anyone understands what these mean, please tell me.

If anyone understands what these mean, please tell me.

Advertisements

10 comments

  1. It is very cool, i want to look at the writing/symbols again.. hey you should post a picture of the them.
    haha you’ll have to make sure to keep a safe distance if i’m holding it..you know how i am at the dinner table when i’m excited and talking full speed with a fork in my hand, that can even be dangerous! 😛

    Like

  2. When I asked my wife for a translation we had to flip the image both vertically and horizontally in order to make the writing legible. In other words, the writing reads from tip of the sword to the hilt, but the characters are mirror images of what they should be. Did you perchance flip the image along the vertical axis yourself? If not, then the stamps used to make the characters were made incorrectly, such that the stamps can be read when looked at yet produce mirrored characters when used, instead of being mirrored stamps which produce legible characters.

    According to my wife the writing indicates that the sword belongs to a certain family’s household (nobody in particular, no-one famous or anything). The top two characters (the bottom two in your photo) are a family name (possibly the owner of the company that produced the sword), the middle character means house, while the bottom two characters (the top two in your photo) together mean sword.

    Like

    1. The computer flipped the images itself, so it’s not incorrect.

      That’s interesting… I wonder which family it is, even if it isn’t a famous one.

      Thanks Capn! I hope I didn’t out you through too much trouble.

      Like

      1. Phil, the wife said the phonetic spelling would be (something close to): Guang Zeng Zai Bao Jian. Guang Zeng is the family name, Guang meaning Light while Zeng means Village (or Little Town). Zai is Household, and Bao Jian together mean Sword.

        Unfortunately you can’t just pronounce them phonetically because in Chinese there are four different tones or types of pronunciations for each word/character (even if the spelling is the same) and each tone changes the meaning of the word based on the context in which it’s being used. Sort of like To, Too, & Two, but in this case there would be a fourth variant/meaning of To, and all four To’s would be spelled the same but pronounced differently depending which one was needed. It’s hardly surprising that I’ve never learned more than a few basic phrases and words of Mandarin 😛

        Anyway, the four pronunciations are a short even tone, a tone which rises towards the end of the word, a tone which dips in the middle of the word then rises at the end, and a tone which falls as you pronounce it. You can read more about spoken Chinese on Wikipedia, as well as listen to examples of each tone.

        In the case of your sword:
        Guang is the first, short, even tone, while Zeng is the fourth decreasing tone.
        Zai is the second, rising tone.
        Bao is the third tone and needs to lower then rise as you say it (even though it’s such a short word), while Jian is the fourth, decreasing tone.

        You’d probably need to practice with a native Mandarin speaker in order to nail the pronunciation, and you’ll have to excuse their giggling because white guys who only speak one language often have a very hard time learning the intonations of other languages, or at least I did…okay, so I still do 😉

        Like

  3. Dude!

    A friend of mine has an EXACT same sword as that one! Except he bought it in China in his hometown, and they were selling it as a ‘novelty’ sword.

    lol, one day he brought it to school, and we tested it out in the field on certain objects xD.

    Scared the shit outta every1. Lmfao.

    Like

Say something!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s